Shop More Submit  Join Login
×




Details

Submitted on
April 22, 2010
Image Size
165 KB
Resolution
1000×561
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,711
Favourites
95 (who?)
Comments
8
×
AO2 40th Day - Urban Area by Kuren AO2 40th Day - Urban Area by Kuren
For the same map from Army of Two: The 40th Day which the Skyscrapers concept covers. This is merely another part of the map, but run down urban area which hasn't been modernized yet.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconnonier:
NonieR Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2010
Oh, and have I told you how much I LOVE these 40th Day urban landscapes and their mix of eras and styles? Your observant use of all the zigged wires really conveys this transitional stage between the pre-electrical and the fully electrified, the phoneless and the cellphone.

I'm not a computer gamer myself--too old to develop the reflexes and too fond of roleplaying around a table with friends I know--but your environments here are always evocative of untold stories.

Would it be all right if I use a private copy of these pics for my own games? They'd just be shown around the table, not published or profited from.

--Nonie
Reply
:iconkuren:
Kuren Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2010
Hey, thanks for the comments and observations. It's always nice to know someone is paying attention to such minute details and story.

As for using the image, I can't really say you can since these images' copyright aren't still entirely mine. But if you're using it for private use, I don't think they'd try to stop you at all. :)
Reply
:iconnonier:
NonieR Featured By Owner Apr 23, 2010
You wrote:

> It's always nice to know someone is paying attention to such minute details and story.

Ditto. <grin>

The world doesn't contain enough gaming artists who can also understand historical architecture, agriculture, basic physics, and all, so I REALLY appreciate those of you who really know what you're doing.

I know the main purpose of gaming is to have fun, so I'm not bothered by creators who don't know the real purpose of castle crenellations or terracing a dryland field, streamlined aircraft or body armor that doesn't channel blows TOWARD your neck; not building houses in flood plains, or putting your laundry line next to your dovecote, or going into battle with lots of trailing ribbons, chains, capes, and long loose hair that could get snagged or used against you.

But when artists DO get these things right, it's like hearing a bell struck, with that deep resonance that goes right through your bones.

Yes, research helps, but the key of it is observation--when you really see something, you can learn to understand it, and it stays in your toolbox for the best work.

Someone without a sharp eye would still draw a transitional city by showing buildings of various eras, but they wouldn't think of things like the wiring--the cluttered, irregular, almost tangled wires that were put up at different times for different reasons, often by amateurs. THAT comes from seeing as well as understanding.

Thank you for doing both, and for being a great artist with what you see; you've really made my year.

Your fan,

--Nonie
Reply
:iconkuren:
Kuren Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2010
That's a huge focus of mine as of late; to focus on story and context. Like, even if my art isn't as pretty or visually splendorous as compared to other artists, I'm okay with that for the most part. I'd like to be able to paint and draw like a crazy mofo, but right now, it's not my focus. I believe in substance over style. Style isn't everything, sometimes style IS the substance, but it always has to have context.

lol, thanks for the compliment. I dunno if I've made your year, cuz there's still quite a bit of year left, but I'm glad I've made your day. (the day when you posted that comment haha)
Reply
:iconnonier:
NonieR Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2010
Then shall we just agree to say you've made my last 365.24 days? (I'm not gonna hunt down the exact breakdown of leap-year variations, so there.)

As for "pretty or visually splendorous," I wouldn't have said your art was lacking in those directions either, but as for pure My Little Pony prettiness I'd say leave that sorta nonsense to the amateurs and keep growing as an artist in the direction that you were born to. Anyone can make a flying island rocky & green, or a badly-drawn sword glow in all sortsa pretty colors. But real artists are something else, and too rare to waste.

Stick to your guns--or, y'know, pen and pixel--and do what nobody but you could do. I ain't the first person to notice how good you are, and I sure as hell won't be the last.

So quit arguing with me and DRAW, dammit! ;)
Reply
:iconkuren:
Kuren Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2010
If I do a concept of a flying rocky island, but it having story and substance, would that be okay? lol (serious)

I've been trying to find the time and energy to do stuff at home. Most of my day is taken up by drawing/painting at work all day. Sadly...but I WILL find the time and energy!
Reply
:iconnonier:
NonieR Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2010
Of course it would be okay! (Silly person....)

However, if it's also got a pink castle for My Little Pony and her best friend Barbie, I would kinda hope you meant it ironically. ;)

Flying islands are fun. Sure, they're not a deeply original idea, but then neither are mountains, cities, spaceships, diners, superheroes, police stations, or dragons. It's all in how you draw 'em.

As for the work/home thing, that's unfortunately a serious side effect of working in a field you love. It happens to writers, programmers, musicians, and probably every other creative types. I know plenty of database programmers who can no longer find the energy to program games at home; session or concert musicians who find it hard to compose any more; technical writers who rarely get around to their own novels or poems these days, and so on.

Most people I know say it's still worth holding a job in your favorite field, even if it leaves you dryer on your own time; it expands your skills and reputation AND pays the rent. But the point you know it's time to quit is when you get seriously blocked and burned out at work, over and over, which means your creative side is fighting back. Some people then change fields entirely; others find it's enough to sidestep from, say, programming to Help Desk, or from writing to teaching writing.

The game work you've posted here is great enough I'll admit to a selfish hope that you can keep doing it for a LONG time, but I hope to see yer fully original work as well.
Reply
:iconvenom-v13:
Venom-V13 Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2010
This is tight, nice work on the lighting!!
Reply
Add a Comment: